Friday, June 03, 2016

Nasty

A colleague whose court has jurisdiction over a major airport tells me that she has recently dealt with a case from 'Operation Jigsaw' the Met Police team that handles repatriated sex offenders.

She told me that a man with 120 and more convictions, many for sex offences, had served time in an antipodean prison, and had been put on a plane to the UK on his release. The magistrates made a highly restrictive order about his future conduct, and he was returned to police custody for the time being.

18 comments:

  1. The irony of Australia sending criminals to the UK. If only we were so good at deporting scum.
    Jaded

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  2. I suppose we started it at Botany Bay.

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  3. Isn't deporting criminals after they have served their sentence doubling the punishment that undeportable criminals face and therefore grossly unjust?

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    1. Er no. If he isn't an Australian citizen then he has no absolute right to stay there. Good on the Australians for kicking him out. I wish we would sort out our self-inflicted difficulties so we could deport the foreign criminals from our country.

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  4. Why was he returned to custody? Is he under suspicion of having committed further offences in the UK? If not, why is he not entitled to be released, having served his sentence abroad.

    And under what powers can the Mags make restrictive orders about his future conduct? Presumably these can only be relevant when (if) he is released.

    No doubt I merely betray my ignorance of modern criminal law, but I an left a little puzzled.

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  5. The police have to prepare an interim then a definitive Sexual Offences Prevention Order. These orders can be exceptionally restrictive, and tailor-made to suit the individual's character. Google is very helpful.

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    1. Need Advice on a case. the Company is based in UK, Can you please share your email?so that I can send you the details.

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  6. "he was returned to police custody for the time being." Since when does the police detain someone apart from for a limited period prior to being charged and being brought before a court?

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  7. "a man with 120 and more convictions, many for sex offences"

    A man? What kind of man?

    So, what is he? Presbyterian? A stockbroker? Mennonite? Chinese? Catholic? A magistrate?

    I hate to tell you, but we are so suspicious of descriptions of male criminals as simply "a man" leads us to believe he is african black, aboriginal or muslim.

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    1. Try reading the papers - he's been all over them - then post a comment

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    2. I would say the opposite: if it just says 'man' I would assume a white, middle aged man. If he were anything else, they wouldn't miss an opportunity to label him: black, muslim or any other term you can think of.

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  8. I don't doubt that the letter of the law has been followed, but I share the concerns of other commenters here about the casual way a person lawfully at large is detained on arrival in the UK just for "paperwork" reasons.

    If on the other hand the man was returned to complete a jail term in the UK, then fair enough.

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  9. He was not deported after serving a sentence in Australia. He was identified by the Australian police as a prolofic sex offender, operating in Malaysia. the Australians notified our serious crime people, or whatever they are called now, and he was arrested on arrival in England, charged, remanded in custody and has recently been sentenced to several life sentences with a minimum term of 23 years. Part of his opeating system was to infiltrate christian groups, as he is a white, 30 year old christian. At least that is the case that is all over the papers.

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    1. Has it occurred to you that it's not the case case?

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  10. Perhaps its a good job he wasn't from another EU country. Having been returned home, other countries haven't the advanced protective laws we have. One can only imagine him obtaining his EU passport, travelling to Ireland or France, and then taking a mass transit route into the UK (even via Northern Ireland). Just imagine the outcry when we couldn't deport that individual! That's why leaving the EU is the only safe alternative.

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    1. "other countries haven't the advanced protective laws we have"
      Where is your evidence for that?

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