Saturday, June 09, 2012

Fraud Focus

Today's news that the police are looking into the vast amount of fraud committed with the help of those who were jailed yesterday struck a chord with me, as I was a victim of ID fraud last year. In the Spring of 2011 a neighbour handed me a letter that was addressed to me, but at his address (we share a postcode)  and I read it to find that a bank had opened me a  new account, and promised to send the the cards in a few days. I phoned them straight away, told them that it was an attempted fraud, and left it at that.
Later that year I applied to a major telephone company for an iPhone, and was turned down because a fraudster had, in the Spring, obtained a phone using my details, but an address in Earls Court to which I have never been. No payment was ever made, so the phone company wrote off the account and put my name in the 'don't touch him' file. No attempt was made to contact me at the address where I have been on the electoral register for 16 years, so I had no way of knowing about any of this until I hit the brick wall of my destroyed credit rating.
I spent hours and wrote letter after letter to Experian, the phone company and two other credit agencies. I was told that a notice would be put on my file, but a month later when I reapplied for the phone, I was told that my credit score was compromised. I have now given up as I am fortunate enough not to need any credit these days.
I am evidently far from alone in these troubles.

28 comments:

  1. Nicholas Bohm9 June 2012 13:29

    The credit reference agencies are committing malicious libels, since they know they have no justification for their allegations that your credit is in doubt.

    What a pity it isn't easier to shut them up and recover some damages in the process.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello, please could you expand on malicious libel if you have the time.
      Regards
      John Gibson

      Delete
  2. IF malicious libel is a genuine claim worthy of a suit - brilliant idea. Hire a silk and sue Experian for being turned down for a loan as you are a bit short - Oh! Wait.......

    ReplyDelete
  3. rex_imperator9 June 2012 15:40

    This type of fraud is one of many and I am amazed that there is anyone left who hasn't been victim of this in one way or another. I have had a near neighbour use my details for his credit applications (including the use of the JP designation - which i wouldn't do on a credit application), a petrol station straight skimming operation etc. My credit card issuer almost recognises my voice when I call. In the first of these examples PC49 became involved but the file was eventually marked as NFA because I was not the loser (my bank made good straightaway, fuss free).

    ReplyDelete
  4. As I discovered many years ago, moving home is an easy way to get someone's deepest details just by the new occupier opening the junk mail or mail that hasn't been redirected.

    The victim suffers the longest, while the antagonist just gets a slapped wrist - if they can be found.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Did this unfortunate episode cause you to have some empathy with the victims of the criminals put before your bench?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Silly, silly boy.

      Have a think about what 'judicial' means.

      Delete
    2. Yes, stupid boy Hibbo. Justice has nothing to do with victims of crime.

      Delete
    3. Ed (not Bystander)10 June 2012 01:33

      I'm confident that Hibbo, despite his "challenges", knows what judicial means. Not 100% sure you do, BS.

      Delete
    4. According to Wikipedia, The first line of the entry for the word 'Judiciary' reads:

      'The "Judiciary" (also known as the judicial system) is the system of courts that interprets and applies the law in the name of the state.'

      Notice the word 'interprets' not 'follows'.

      BTW, I removed the previous comment owing to a spelling mistake.

      Delete
    5. BS, this clearly illustrates why the law abiding, the police, and in particular victim of crime, find you and your ilk so infuriating - and also why criminals love you.

      I know this is your hobby, but it is NOT a game.

      Delete
    6. AnotherNorthernJP10 June 2012 22:10

      @VBW It is in Wikipedia. Sure to be right then.

      Delete
    7. Hibbo, are you trolling or do you actually have any evidence (JPs love evidence of course) that BS is a) immune to victim empathy and/or b) that everyone but criminals hates magistrates?

      You may have a point to make; but if you have, you have concealed it well.

      Delete
    8. Biker, I am not trolling. I have not said everyone hates mags, I have said that many people find the judiciary infuriating. Have a read of police blogs if you don't believe me.

      Delete
  6. It's not only those who were jailed yesterday who help with such crimes you know. But your tale really resonates. Spot on.

    ReplyDelete
  7. ..... you say that you are fortunate enough not to need credit these days and I think I know what you mean - lucky you :o). However if you want any service for which you don't pay in advance then you do need credit - say a phone contract for instance :o)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That nice Mr. Tesco's PAYG seems to work fine. No apps though, so I have to use my iPad for that.

      Delete
  8. Hmmmm! My bride and I live in a house we had built for us on a green-field site. There are NO previous occupiers, yet we regularly get direct mailings addressed to people whose names mean nothing to us. The peddlers of mailing lists make a healthy profit (I assume) but are pretty loath to clean them.

    ReplyDelete
  9. These systems are ok when everything goes well, if anything goes wrong they can become anightmare and the ordinary madn in the street can find it almost impossible to put things right.
    don't be afraid to complain and doen't be put off- it might take some time but eventually ou should get it sorted.

    PS- watch out for this Experian credit check - frree for 30 days then about 7 quid a month its a rip off and very difficult to stop once it gets started.

    another example of teh spiv society.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Well, you don't have to take it lying down:

    http://www.bailii.org/ew/cases/EWHC/QB/2012/2088.html

    Mr Smeaton has gone on the offensive against the credit agencies for having inaccurate records (albeit in different circumstances), with sucess in the above initial round of litigation.

    ReplyDelete
  11. HH Judge Thornton's judgment is an impressive read - I wonder whether Equifax will appeal it, or prudently settle, given that the same couldn't happen now?

    On a slight side turn, if we go for equality and diversity in selecting judges will we still get the quality that this judge demonstrates?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. HHJ Thornton has had an interesting life, judging by the albeit partial evidence of press reports, but clambered back after what could have proved a major setback In anyone's career.

      Delete
  12. This is a very useful lesson for all those who "sit in judgment" that rehabilitation is not only possible but eminently achievable, if people are given the opportunity.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If we didn't believe that rehabilitation is possible then we should not be sitting "in judgement".

      Delete
    2. Tsk.

      I believe both versions are acceptable English. So dont' worry.

      Delete
  13. To all you losers and victims of fraud out there-i'm going to be rich soon,a Nigerian General has contacted me and and has promised me a large amount of money just for borrowing my bank account!

    ReplyDelete
  14. Bystander, as a worker in fincancial services, the magic word to use is "complaint". Won't work with phone companies and the like, but with banks, credit card issuers, insurers, etc, a "complaint" instantly gets a dedicated handler who can actually make things happen.

    ReplyDelete

Posts are pre-moderated. Please bear with us if this takes a little time, but the number of bores and obsessives was getting out of hand, as were the fake comments advertising rubbish.